CHRISTOPHER PINNEY CAMERA INDICA PDF

We are now sloughing off discussed by Yalouri in this issue written in Moscow in this baleful interregnum and rediscovering the vitality of the dark days of the Nazi onslaught. This is a word, he those earlier debates forged during the gravest of crises. DOI: This is the transformative crisis, just as the outcome of a fever is Benjamin for whom photographers were the descendants determined by crisis.

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His doctoral research was concerned with transformations contingent on changing work regimes among industrial workers in central India. This was based on 15 months field research in an industrial town and nearby village and this location has remained the empirical focus of his work on other topics within South Asian anthropology and visual culture.

Subsequently he worked on archival photography, investigating the role of image-making within early anthropological practice. He then conducted further field research in central India on popular visual culture, including photography and devotional imagery. The work on popular studio photography was published as Camera Indica in As well as fieldwork at a village level looking at patterns of consumption he also worked extensively in archives in India, the UK and the USA researching the history of Hindu chromolithography.

In addition to assembling, for the first time, a history of this genre covering the period , this project has also explored the question of the inappropriateness of European aesthetics for an Indian History of Art, arguing instead for a more "ethnosociological" and phenomenological approach.

This project was published in book form with the title Photos of the Gods []. These lectures were published as a book in This will involve fieldwork in Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal, and the direction of a team of researchers working in Nicaragua, Nigeria, Greece, Sri Lanka and Cambodia. A study of mirages and anomalous visual perception in situations of cultural stress and dislocation. This should appear in Lessons from Hell: Printing and Punishment in India.

A study of pedagogic images of punishments in hell from It examines questions of cross-media transformations from manuscript traditions to mass-produced prints and the relationship between cosmological and governmentalist idioms of obedience. The transgressions which provoke punishment codify a caste-based moral order and the transformations in representation provide the raw data for a history of changing idioms of power.

The book also incorporates recent ethnographic research on the consequences of action, and a detailed reading with a village priest of the Garuda Purana, the chief textual codification of punishment. Historically and ethnographically based, it contrasts hierarchical modes of the transmission of legitimacy within an idiom of shruti what was heard , with a generative subaltern visual practice of prakatan manifestation.

The ethnographic focus of this project concerns Dalit shamanism in central India and the political potential of visual form and excess.

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Artisan Camera

Broken link? Description Chicago : University of Chicago Press, p. ISBN Summary A wedding couple gazes resolutely out at the viewer from the wings of a butterfly, a commemorative portrait of a deceased boy surrounded by rose petals - such moving and quiet images represent the changing role of photographic portraiture in India, a topic Christopher Pinney explores in Camera Indica: The Social Life of Indian Photographs. Studying photographic practice as it is embedded in Indian society over the last years, Pinney, an anthropologist, traces the various purposes and goals of photography through colonial and postcolonial times. Pinney identifies three key moments In Indian portraiture: the use of photography as a quantifiable instrument of measurement under British rule, the role of portraiture in moral instruction, and the current visual style of popular culture and its effects on modes of picturing. Photographic culture thus becomes a mutable realm in which capturing likeness is only part of the project. Today, Indian images are characterized by a distinctive postcolonial photographic practice, which involves sophisticated inventiveness and techniques such as overpainting, collage, composite printing and doubling.

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Christopher Pinney

Studying photographic practice as it is embedded in Indian society over the last years, Pinney, an anthropologist, traces the various purposes and goals of photography through colonial and postcolonial times. Pinney identifies three key moments In Indian portraiture: the use of photography as a quantifiable instrument of measurement under British rule, the role of portraiture in moral instruction, and the current visual style of popular culture and its effects on modes of picturing. Photographic culture thus becomes a mutable realm in which capturing likeness is only part of the project. Today, Indian images are characterized by a distinctive postcolonial photographic practice, which involves sophisticated inventiveness and techniques such as overpainting, collage, composite printing and doubling.

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